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Author Topic: Tigeriron  (Read 1038 times)

brodziak

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Tigeriron
« on: April 26, 2017, 09:19:25 AM »
Hi, I am new here and would like some expert opinion. I am actually a custom knifemaker and have been given a very nice lump of tigeriron which has been cut into 20mm slabs. I would like to shape this into knife handles but don't know where to start. My question is what machinery and or equipment do I need. I am willing to spend whatever is needed as I think this will be ongoing. Any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks
David

Bucket

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2017, 11:55:53 AM »
Welcome to the forum David.
Check out this link, its worth a look. There are other subjects, just type in 'knife' to the search box at the top of the page.
http://aussielapidaryforum.com/forum/index.php?topic=2152.msg41873#msg41873
Common sense isn't exactly common

brodziak

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2017, 01:15:31 PM »
Thanks Alf, I am making solid handles with a drilled tang hole so a different process to scales but worth a look.

Rusted

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2017, 06:49:36 PM »
Welcome Brodziac

What you are attempting shouldn't be too hard and probably can be accomplished with some fairly basic equipment.
Drilling the hole for the tang will probably be the most challenging part of the process.
I presume if you are making knives you know your way around basic machinery such as grinders and sanders, really thats basically all you will need.

For shaping the handle you will need a grinder, this will need to be done wet, silica dust getting into your lungs is not good, dry grinding will also crack your rock.
A normal bench grinder is not really built for wet grinding so you will need to get hold of an arbor. Around about now I would usually recommend getting a couple of Diamond wheels, probably 6" by 1 1/2' wide, around 180 or 220 grit or maybe a little coarser and a 600 grit. In your situation where you will want nice curves a couple of Silicon carbide wheels probably would be better as you can dress them to a bit of a radius to help give you that curve.
There is a difference between lapidary wheels and normal engineering wheels but you will probably get away with using normal wheels if you dress them regularly to expose sharp grit.

Sanding, you probably already have a linisher, if its got silicon carbide belts then you are set to go, you will probably need 240grit 600grit and about 1000 grit.
If you are using diamond belts all the better but Aluminium Oxide or Garnet or Emery forget it. This will need to be done wet as well, but not as wet as grinding, you can use a pump spray bottle to dampen the dust and keep things cool.
You could also make up flat laps to go on your arbor, glue on a bit of wetsuit foam and then wet and dry on that. Wet and dry is not all that durable but if you use the latex glue shearers use for their sharpeners then you can easily replace it.

Polishing, after you have got your stone completely scratch free and have a dull satin finish (almost polish) on it you can progress to the polish.
You will need some Tin Oxide, and a buff of some sort, hard engineers felt makes a good buff, leather is also good.
Make a wet paste with the tin oxide and paint it on your buff, not too much and not too wet, a bit of pressure and you will soon (within seconds) see a polish developing, don't let it dry out, heat will build up very quickly and shatter your stone.

Drilling, Its probably best to do this first, that way any chips can be taken out while shaping.
You will need Diamond drills to do this, underwater, slowly, very little pressure and pulse the drill to allow water to cool the drill and flush the hole.

Hope that helps
Paul

brodziak

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2017, 07:08:21 PM »
Thank you Paul, I appreciate your valuable advice and look forward to forward to setting up the wheels. I was looking at cabbing machines today and could maybe some of the wheels with a modified shaft and water bath.

David

Rusted

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2017, 07:28:11 PM »
Better to drip the water onto the wheels than a water bath, especially if you are using Silicon carbide.
Wheels sitting in water and then being turned on can get badly out of balance and shatter.

brodziak

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2017, 09:53:29 PM »
Thanks Alf, I do have a lot to learn.

Is the optimum speed about 1800 rpm

David

Rusted

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2017, 06:11:55 PM »
Yes that sounds about right for a 6" wheel

Your grinding wheel should have the maximum RPM printed on it somewhere
Be careful of running wheels too slow, this causes them to become bumpy really quickly, I don't know why, its something my dad drilled into me, he was an old school turner and fitter come engineer. He was right too, as an 8' wheel wore down to a 6" you would notice the bumps happening and need to move the belt up to the next one on the cone pulley to get the speed right again.

brodziak

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2017, 12:25:37 PM »
Thanks Alf, I will keep that in mind.
David


FlashGP

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2017, 06:17:43 PM »
Rusted

I have been talking to an old school engineering teacher about cutting speeds.  He says there are tables of optimal cutting and grinding speeda for each type of metal.  They are expressed as feet or metres per second.  This means that the smaller the wheel or cutter, the faster it needs to spin. 

The same applies to lapidary.  I find my 6 inch laps cut better with less wear if I spin them relatively quickly on my faceting machine.

Silicon carbide wheels come in different hardnesses.  Softer for hard metals so they shed and don't glaze over.  Hard for soft metals.  Same probably applies to rock.

Use light pressure.  Press too hard and the rock creates a positive feedback loop making any bumps worse.  I have seen a sintered hammered 1cm out of round this way at a lapidary club.

Regards
Flash

Yours Sincerely
Flash (Gordon)

southerly

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2017, 04:45:46 PM »
Can't wait to see what you do with the Tigger Iron David, for those not familiar with custom knives David is a very accomplished (as in elite custom) knife maker.

MakkyBrown

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Re: Tigeriron
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2017, 05:33:37 PM »
I like to shape on a flat lap rolling the knife scale then finish on soft nova type wheels. Either a diamond lap or silicon carbide powder on steel/cast iron lap. Rough grind shape first, 220/600grit lap,  300, 600, 1200, 3000, 14000 soft wheels, then final polish by hand.
I find using a lap you can get nice sharp edges where you want them a nice curve across the scale(especially the edges). And not perfect spots away from the scale edges can be removed with the nova wheels.
I really should get on to finishing the three buck knives I have sitting here with fern scales.
Using tiger iron as think you have cut(or even above 5mm thick) it should be ok. I tried some thin knife scale out of tiger iron(3mm) on a swiss army knife and one decided to break in half.

Cheers
Andrew
We are a family of 4 from Southern Tasmania.

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